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    The Jubilee Singers. (1875). Image courtesy of the New York Public Library.

McClain-Stewart Nuptials

Nashville Globe: July 5, 1907

One of the prettiest home weddings of this season was witnessed by a company of about 150 relatives and friends on Wednesday, June 26, at high noon, at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Stewart, 99 Claiborne street, when Miss Fate Lou Stewart and Dr. T. E. McClain were united in marriage. Before a back ground of ferns, vines, and flowers the ceremony was performed promptly at 12 o’clock. Rev. Fisher, pastor of Olive Baptist Church in Chicago, came down to perform the ceremony, which he did in a very simple yet impressive manner.

The bridal party entered the drawing room through bridal gates wreathed in southern smilax and roses, which were opened by two little girls, Aileen Streator and Jenetta Bright, who were beautifully dressed in white lingerie frocks and blue sashes; next came the maid of honor, and the bride’s only attendant, Miss Lillian A. Bright. She was gowned in a blue batiste beautifully trimmed in lace and tucks, blue slippers, gloves, girdle and a blue hair braid hat were worn. She carried a large bouquet of pink carnations tied with blue ribbons; next came the little flower girl, Lillian Dixon, strewing flowers along the bride’s pathway. She wore a pretty lingerie dress with white ribbons. Then came the bride leaning on the arm of her brother, Mr. Wm. Stewart, of Michigan, who gave her in marriage. The bride never appeared more beautiful than she did in her wedding robe. A charming picture of loveliness, in a French mouseline elaborately trimmed in real Val lace and numerous fine tucks, with a white pompadour satin girdle. A handmade milline hat, with ostrich plumes and jeweled pins completed the toilet. She carried a beautiful bouquet of bride’s roses and ferns, tied with white satin ribbon. Her only ornaments were a diamond ring, the gift of the groom, and diamond earrings, the gift of her mother.

The groom, with his best man, Mr. Eugene Page, entered from the hall and met the bride at the altar. Both wore Prince Alberts with gray trousers and gloves.

The bridal party formed a semi-circle around the altar which made a beautiful picture long to be remembered. After the ceremony all turned and faced the audience to receive congratulations.

Mrs. Jennie Ballentyne presided at the piano, playing the wedding march, also accompanying the two soloists, Dr. Mattie Coleman sang “Love me, and the world is mine” very sweetly, “Because God made you mine” was beautifully rendered by Miss Alberta K. Davis.

The receiving party consisted of Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Stewart, Mr. and Mrs. John Cunningham, Misses Mattie Scales, Rebecca McCants and Lettie Black. The wedding register was kept by Miss Elizabeth Elliott. Frappe was dispensed to the guests by Hattie May Stewart and Pryor Williams.

The presents were many, rare, costly, valuable, and too numerous to mention here.

Mr. and Mrs. McClain left on the 7:40 train for Denver, Colo., their future home, where the doctor has already established himself. The bride’s going away dress wa a blue taffeta, made guimpe with lingerie blouse, tan hat, belt, slippers and gloves.

The out of town guests were Rev. and Dr. Coleman, of Clarksville; Miss Lettie Black, of Jefferson, and Rev. E. J. Fisher of Chicago; Mr. William Stewart of Michigan, who came down especially to attend the marriage; Dr. Edwards, of McMinnville; Dr. Reed, of Kentucky.

[I think there may be more that is cut off in my copy] IssueID=2

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2 Comments

  1. Terri Gentry

     /  April 21, 2014

    I am so excited to see this posting!!! Dr. and Mrs. McClain are my great-grandparents. He was the 1st Black LICENSED dentist to practice in Colorado. I have shared this with my dad, aunt, and sisters. Thank you!

    Reply
    • Hi Terri! I’m so pleased to know you find this of value! I love to hear from those related to the stories I post. I’m going to email you.

      Reply

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