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    The Jubilee Singers. (1875). Image courtesy of the New York Public Library.

City Items – March 1, 1907

From the Nashville Globe – 1 Mar 1907

  • Mrs. P.R. Burrus, Mrs. N.J. Anderson, Mrs. Ligon, Mrs. R.S. White, Mrs. Ferguson and Miss Lena Jackson, representing the esteem and love of many of their friends, came laden with good things Saturday night to the parsonage of Howard Church, making the hearts of the pastor and wife glad.  Rev. J. Bond says  “Come again.”
  • The Misses Franklin, of 78 Claiborne street, were called to North Nashville Tuesday morning to attned the funeral of their cousin, Carrie E. Cleveland.
  • Mrs. Elizabeth Becton, of 819 Stevens street, left for Battle Creek, Mich., Saturday night.
  • There will be a parlor concert on Wednesday evening, March 6, at the residence of Miss Mattie Matthews, 440 Eigth avenue, North, by the Willing Workers Club for the benefit of Tabernacle Baptist Church.
  • Miss Zenith McKatherine, who waited on her sick father until his death, never wearied, her kind hands were willing to do all they could to add to his comfort.  One year ago she left Walden University, and went to Lake Providence to attend her father, Mr.  Thom. McKatherine.  She did her duty lovingly and faithfully until the end.
  • Mr. I.W. Hydye, of 1606 Alberta Avenue, is suffering from influenza.
  • Mr. John Watkins arrived from New Orleans Tuesday night.
  • Mr. Jno. Langston Poole, of Meharry Medical College, leaves this week for Chicago.
  • The Meharry commencement has been changed from the first of April to the 29th of March.
  • Mrs. I.J. Jordan, of 514 Watkins street, who has been ill, is much improved.
  • Mr. William D. Boger was called to Marietta, Ga., last Saturday to attend the funeral of his grandmother who died last Friday.  He returned to the city Monday.
  • Prof. W.L. Cansler, though still confined to his room, is improving.
  • Quite a large number of Meharry boys left last Saturday for Chicago.
  • The Fisk Literary Club will hold its next meeting at the home of Miss Laura Stump, Twelfth avenue, North and Jackson street, March 7, at three o’clock.
  • Mrs. Myrtle Hicks and children have returned to their home in Indianapolis after a visit to her mother Mrs. Hill.
  • Mr. Eugene Clayton, of East Nasvhille, will leave in a few days for New York, Buffalo and Washington, D.C.  Mr. Clayton will be out of the city for about two weeks.
  • Attorney G.F. Anderson took a brief trip to Gallatin, Tenn., on legal business and it was quite successful.  He also made a trip to Livingston, Tenn.
  • The young ladies’ club of the First Baptist Church, East Nashville, will give their entertainment March 11.
  • Mr. and Mrs. Frank Carter were called to their home in Evansville, Ind., on the account of sudden illness of her mother.
  • The young men’s club of First Baptist Church, East Nashville, gave an entertainment Monday night which proved quite a success.
  • The death of Mrs. Mary Mason, mother of Miss Queenie Arnold, of East Nashville, was very sad.  The funeral took place Tuesday.
  • The Ladies’ Imperial Needlework Club met in regular meeting with Mrs. Napoleon Ransom, Wedndesday afternoon.  Several important topics were discussed, after which an article on “What women are doing” was read by Mrs. Herrod, which was very effective.  The ladies adjourned to meet next week with Mrs. J.H. Smith, of Phillips street.
  • Mrs. A.C. Gibson, of South High street, who has been reported very sick, is much improved.
  • Mr. Louis D. Bumbrey, who for some time was in the employ of the National Baptist Publishing Board, is in town.
  • Mrs. A.E. Montague, of 526 Fourth avenue, South, is slightly indispose this week.
  • The many friends of Mrs. A.J. Dodd will regret to learn that she is confined to her bed again.  At this writing she is improving.
  • Miss Annie May Neely has returned to the city after a month’s stay with her uncle in Columbia.  Mr. Harry McLawrine, who has been visiting his mother in Mt. Pleasant, accompanied Miss Neely back to the city.
  • Mrs. William Dopson, of 1892 Fourth avenue, North, is going to spend the latter part of the month in Columbia, Ohio.
  • Mrs. Ella Brown Beard passed away on the 22nd of this month.  Her funeral was held on the 24th at the Fifteenth Avenue Baptist Church.
  • Mrs. James Dismukes entertained Wednesday at her home, 516 Fourteenth avenue, North.  Mrs. Wm. Richardson, of 1207 Phillips street, and Mrs. W.M. Cannon and little daughter, Glenora, with a one o’clock dinner.
  • Born to Mr. and Mrs. George L. Stratton, of 1507 Fourteenth avenue, a girl.  Mother and daughter are doing nicely.
  • Mr. and Mrs. Richard Jackson were entertained at her home 315 Eighth avenue, North, with her many friends, Monday night, February 25, she being thirty-four years old.  Those prsent were Mesdames Warmack, Frierson, Burrus, Dozier, Young, Overton, Misses Josie Thompson, Bell, Messrs. Jordan, Overton.  Dr. B.F. Davis spoke to the guests on “Life is what you make it.”  A number of presents were received by Mrs. Jackson.
  • Mrs. Lyttleton Jones has been confined to her bed for several days, suffering from an attack of la-grippe.  Mrs. Jones and daughter, Mrs. Kate Steele are located at 707 Jefferson street and Seventh avenue, North.
  • Mrs. Eliza Davidson, who has been sick for the last two weeks, is very much improved.
  • Mr. Jno. L. Cheatham, of 819 Eighteenth avenue, is on the sick list this week.
  • Mr. and Mrs. Prince, of Patterson street, spent Sunday and Sunday night in Franklin with his mother, who is very ill.
  • Mrs. Whigsaw, of 1918 Broadway, is expecting her two sisters from Indianapolis soon.
  • Mrs. Rueben O’Neal, who has been sick for several weeks, is up and out again.  She wishes to thank her many friends for their kindness during her illness.

Frances Williard Memorial

Nashville Globe
22 Feb 1907

The women of the colored W.C.T.U. met in Howard Congregational Church Sunday afternoon to rejoice over the Segregation Bill, which removes saloons from the vicinity of our two universities dear to our hear, Fisk & Walden. Now it will be a delight to live in the suburbs, as the saloon nuisance will be removed.

Mrs. C.H. Phillips gave an address on The Life and Influence of Frances Williard, also a glimpse of “Rest Cottage” built by Miss Williard. Impassioned speeches were made in the discussion, which followed by Miss Nannie Perkins, who took the ground that the bitter taste alone of beer makes it replsive to children and they would never drink it if their parents did not encourage it by example. She owes her abhorrence to all such habits from the example and training of her sainted mother.

Mrs. Sawyers spoke of her love for the work and her intention of sticking to the W.C.T.U. Mrs. Clark and others spoke on the coming W.C.T.U. convention to Nashville.

After Rev. Mr. Bond’s instructive remarks on the temperance legislation, Mrs. John Work said that the recent great crime was fostered by the drink habit. She then sang feelingly, “We’ll overcome some day.” Mrs. Phillips; Chairman of the Committee on Homes for the Convention, calls a mass meeting the third Sunday in March. The Sarah J. Early section will discuss the “cigarette habit.”

Signed by the Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. D.W. Crutcher.

City B.Y.P.U. Organized

Nashville Globe
22 Feb 1907

One of the largest missionary meetings ever held in Nashville for young people was held in the Sunday school rooms of Mt. Olive Baptist Church Sunday afternoon, February 17. The meeting was called to order at 2:30pm by Rev. W.L. Craft, who is the field secretary of the B.Y.P.U. Board. At this meeting a long step in the right direction was made which resulted in the organization in Nashville of what will be known as “The City B.Y.P.U.” Every Baptist church in the cit has been invited to join, and, in fact, all save one or two were represented either in person or by proxy at the meeting Sunday. Rev. C.H. Clark, the pastor, towering as he does above all others, encouraged the movement in the most hearty way possible. An excellent program was rendered. An opening chorus was sung by the Mt. Olive choir. Scripture was read by Rev. C.K. Wilson. Then came prayer. A song by the choir, then came the discussion, which was “The Union a Factor in the Missionary Development of our Denomination.” This discussion was led by Revs. Clark, Slaughter, Harding, Parr, Page and Matthews, and Rev. Draine and others were invited to make speeches on the subject. Miss Maud Roberts, of Walden University, was present and sang “Teach Me Thy Way” sweeter than it has ever been heard in Nashville.

“Our Needs” was discussed by the Dr. E.W.D. Isaac, the Corresponding Secretary of the B.Y.P.U. Board. Mrs. L.A. Davis played an instrumental solo. Possibly the most interesting and entertaining piece on the program was the trio by Miss Reed, Mrs. Henderson, and Dr. A.M. Townsend. Their voices charmed the audience. Every one strained their ears to catch every note of the sweet music made by them.

A committee on Organization was nominated and while they were out, Miss M.M. Kimball, of Louisville, who represents the Woman’s Auxillary Convention, addressed the audience. The committee reported the following officers as the first for the ensuing year: J. Blaine Boyd, Miss Mattie Matthews, Tabernacle Church, First Vice President; Mr. Jesse Voorhees, Kayne Avenue Church, Second Vice President; Mr. Wm. Cantrell, St. John Baptist Church, Third Vice President; Miss Maggie Stubbs, First Baptist Church, Recording Secretary; E. W. D. Isaac, Jr.; Spruce Street Baptist Church; Miss Matilda Williams, First Baptist Church, East Nashville, Treasurer; Mr. Wm. Sheffield, New Hope Church, Chorister; Dr. A.M. Townsend, Spruce Street Baptist Church, Organist.

It was agreed that the Union would meet once per month and that one month’s notice would be given for all churches to prepare special subjects and present their claims for those on program. The first monthly meeting will be held March 17, which is the third Sunday in March, at the Pleasant Green Baptist Church. The meeting will be called together promptly at 8 o’clock. Indications are that a large number of young people will be brought into this working organization.

News of Nashville – November 10, 1917

    From the Chicago Defender November 10, 1917

  • President G.W. Hubbard of Meharry Medical College has returned to the city after a visit to New York, where he attended the meeting of the National Association of Dental Faculties
  • “The Model Home” was the subject of Rev. W. S. Ellington’s discourse last Sunday morning.
  • An attendance of seventy-five was reported for the Meharry Bible class at St. Paul’s A.M.E. church Sunday
  • E.L. Dunnings, A.B., senior medic, Meharry Medical College, was the guest of F.J. Myles, the Defender reporter, at 3528 West End avenue, Saturday.
  • Capt. M.V. Boutte and Lieut. H.A. Cameron left the city for Rockford, Ill. Tuesday night. They will be stationed at Camp Grant and will assist in training the Race men at that place.
  • The various educational institutions were visited during the week by Secretary Fabius of the YMCA international committee, together with two assistants, Belchaer and Evans, in the interest of the student friendship war fund. Fisk, Walden, Roger Williams universities, Meharry Medical College and the A & I State Normal were all visited and several hundred dollars in cash was tendered by the student of each institution.
  • L.E. Brown, the K. of P. secretary of Tennessee, whose home is in Memphis, was in the city this week.
  • Monroe Jordan of Pulaski, Tenn., is a popular junior dentist at Meharry Dental College.
  • Last week 150 men left the city for Camp Meade, Md. Some of Nashville’s best young men answered the country’s call.
  • Miss Hattie S. Hendly, 111 36th avenue South, was a visitor in North Nashville Sunday.
  • Mrs. Nelson G. Merry, wife of the late Rev. Nelson G. Merry, is dead.
  • The Chauffers’ Instructive association will hold a stag on Nov. 15 at the German-American hall.
  • Pearl High School had a dance last Saturday night at the German-American hall.
  • Miss Bertha Stevens and Ethel Mayberry, Louisiana, have returned for study at Roger Williams university.
  • Leonard Jones and Miss Gordon Officer were guests of Roger Williams university in a big cadillac.

Y.M.C.A.

Y.M.C.A.
Nashville Globe – January 25, 1907
Pg. 2

Dr. Kumler, President of Walden University, will speak Sunday at 4pm to the YMCA. Rooms 5101-2 Cedar street. Men only. Mr. E. C. McNairy will favor the audience with a solo.

Brentwood Notes

Brentwood Notes
Nashville Globe – January 18, 1907
pg. 6

  • Miss Idabelle Phillips, of Cane Springs, Ky., visited her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Phillips, last week.
  • Rev. S. M. Utley, of the West Nashville District held his Second Quarterly Conference at Brook’s Chapel M.E. Church, Saturday night, January 12. The meeting was very interesting and the largest attended quarterly conference in this church for many years. Rev. Utley is a man of great ability and presides with such cool deliberation, which has won for him the confidence and respect of his congregation. Rev. Utley states that the Brook’s Chapel is ahead of all the other churches in his District in paying the pastor and other church expenses.
  • Mr. and Mrs. Ed Bills, after an illness of about two months were both able to attend church last Sunday and take communion.
  • Rev. James Finnell, of Brook’s Chapel, M. E. Church, is taking a course in theology at Walden University, Nashville.
  • Mr. Rice Ewing, of Nashville, spent last Monday in Brentwood visiting the family of Roden Perkins and left last evening for St. Louis, Mo.
  • Mrs. Laura Spratt is quite sick at her home on the Granny White Pike.
  • Mr. John Armstrong lost a very very fine mare last week, she was only sick a few hours.
  • Messrs. Bell Leek and R. Harper have the contract for widening the railroad track in Dr. Oden’s cut. The nice weather has allowed them to make good head-way with their work.
  • Mr. William D. Vernon went to Tuskegee a few days ago to enter that institution, when they examined him they found he was too far advanced for their grades, so one of the teachers wrote his father, Mr. Samuel Vernon.
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