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    The Jubilee Singers. (1875). Image courtesy of the New York Public Library.

Descendants of W.T. Hightower

Tonight I was contacted by another descendant of W.T. Hightower, a merchant from Nashville. This is the second descendant in the past six months.  I love it!

With that, I decided to look again at the family of William Thomas Hightower Sr. and I found a couple of more census records to add to their tree

With some more online searching, I located a reference to W.T. in the book Evidence of Progress Among Colored People by G.F. Richings, published in 2005.  In the book, it mentions that “W.T. Hightower started a business as a dealer in old rags and iron with a capital of 25 cents.  He now owns a large brick building and a beautiful home.”

Many others from Nashville are also mentioned in the book, including J.C. Napier, Preston A. Taylor,  Dr. R.F. Boyd, and others. I’ll have to look at this more closely.

Kelly- Winfrey

Nashville Globe: July 5, 1907

Little Rock, Ark., June 27 — the wedding of Miss Mabel Winfrey, of this city, and Mr. John H. Kelly Jr., of Nashville, was solomnized at the First Congregational Church of Battle Rock Wednesday evening. The general opinion is that it was one of the prettiest weddings ever witnessed among the people of the City of Roses. The church was beautifully decorated with cut flowers, potted plants, ferns and lilies, forming a beautiful background. The arch under which the happy couple stood was laden with lilies from the center of which hung a floral design in the shape of a bell. This made a picture long to be remembered. While the audience was waiting for the bridal party to enter Miss Carrie Booker rendered a very sweet selection, “Dearie.”

To the strains of Mendelssohn’s wedding march, played by Miss Stella E. Bush, the bridal party entered, led by the four ushers, Messrs. Frank A. Young, Oscar A. Miller, Berestful W. Jackson and Chester E. Bush. Next came the four bridesmaids, Misses Mattie A. Booker, Ethel M. Pitts, Mattie C. Winfrey and Maggie E. Kelly, of Columbia, Tenn., beautifully gowned in pink, green, blue and lavender organdies respectively, carrying carnations and ferns. The best man, Dr. Frank B. Adair, of Humphrey, Ark., followed by the matron of honor, Mrs. Lida Gilliane, of Ft. Smith, Ark., gowned in white chiffon with blue ribbons and carrying an armful of white carnations and ferns, entered. After these came the ring bearer, little Sara Booker, dressed in white embroidered swiss. She was followed by two little flower girls, Olga Jordan and Hazel Lindsay, who were dressed in white accordion pleated organdies, carrying baskets filled with roses which they strewed in the brides’ path. From the vestry room in the rear came Mr. John H. Kelly, Jr., who stood under the arch and awaited the coming of the bride, who entered leaning on the arm of her brother, Mr. Robert C. Winfrey. The bride’s dress was a creation of white silk chiffon over liberty satin with panel front and yoke of imported silk embroidered chiffon, trimmed with frills of accordion pleated chiffon, white satin ribbon and chiffon rush. Her veil which extended to the end of her train, was caught up with orange blossoms. She carried an armful of bride’s roses. During the ceremony, which was performed by Ref. Y. B. Sims, the pastor, Miss Birdie Mae Boyd, of Oberlin, O., sang sweetly “O Promise Me.”

The reception was at the bride’s home, 2400 Adams street.

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