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    The Jubilee Singers. (1875). Image courtesy of the New York Public Library.

Davidson County Teachers

Nashville Globe
1 Mar 1907

The Davidson County teachers held quite an interesting session February 9, 1907. The subject of Hodge’s Nature studies was discussed by Prof. W.R. Davis. A solo was sung by Miss Helene Lowe, daughter of Prof. C.B. Lowe. Many visitors were present, Prof. Wright of Buena Vista School gave a valuable talk to the teachers.

McClain-Stewart Nuptials

Nashville Globe: July 5, 1907

One of the prettiest home weddings of this season was witnessed by a company of about 150 relatives and friends on Wednesday, June 26, at high noon, at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Stewart, 99 Claiborne street, when Miss Fate Lou Stewart and Dr. T. E. McClain were united in marriage. Before a back ground of ferns, vines, and flowers the ceremony was performed promptly at 12 o’clock. Rev. Fisher, pastor of Olive Baptist Church in Chicago, came down to perform the ceremony, which he did in a very simple yet impressive manner.

The bridal party entered the drawing room through bridal gates wreathed in southern smilax and roses, which were opened by two little girls, Aileen Streator and Jenetta Bright, who were beautifully dressed in white lingerie frocks and blue sashes; next came the maid of honor, and the bride’s only attendant, Miss Lillian A. Bright. She was gowned in a blue batiste beautifully trimmed in lace and tucks, blue slippers, gloves, girdle and a blue hair braid hat were worn. She carried a large bouquet of pink carnations tied with blue ribbons; next came the little flower girl, Lillian Dixon, strewing flowers along the bride’s pathway. She wore a pretty lingerie dress with white ribbons. Then came the bride leaning on the arm of her brother, Mr. Wm. Stewart, of Michigan, who gave her in marriage. The bride never appeared more beautiful than she did in her wedding robe. A charming picture of loveliness, in a French mouseline elaborately trimmed in real Val lace and numerous fine tucks, with a white pompadour satin girdle. A handmade milline hat, with ostrich plumes and jeweled pins completed the toilet. She carried a beautiful bouquet of bride’s roses and ferns, tied with white satin ribbon. Her only ornaments were a diamond ring, the gift of the groom, and diamond earrings, the gift of her mother.

The groom, with his best man, Mr. Eugene Page, entered from the hall and met the bride at the altar. Both wore Prince Alberts with gray trousers and gloves.

The bridal party formed a semi-circle around the altar which made a beautiful picture long to be remembered. After the ceremony all turned and faced the audience to receive congratulations.

Mrs. Jennie Ballentyne presided at the piano, playing the wedding march, also accompanying the two soloists, Dr. Mattie Coleman sang “Love me, and the world is mine” very sweetly, “Because God made you mine” was beautifully rendered by Miss Alberta K. Davis.

The receiving party consisted of Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Stewart, Mr. and Mrs. John Cunningham, Misses Mattie Scales, Rebecca McCants and Lettie Black. The wedding register was kept by Miss Elizabeth Elliott. Frappe was dispensed to the guests by Hattie May Stewart and Pryor Williams.

The presents were many, rare, costly, valuable, and too numerous to mention here.

Mr. and Mrs. McClain left on the 7:40 train for Denver, Colo., their future home, where the doctor has already established himself. The bride’s going away dress wa a blue taffeta, made guimpe with lingerie blouse, tan hat, belt, slippers and gloves.

The out of town guests were Rev. and Dr. Coleman, of Clarksville; Miss Lettie Black, of Jefferson, and Rev. E. J. Fisher of Chicago; Mr. William Stewart of Michigan, who came down especially to attend the marriage; Dr. Edwards, of McMinnville; Dr. Reed, of Kentucky.

[I think there may be more that is cut off in my copy] IssueID=2

Society News – June 28, 1907

As published in the Nashville Globe:

These are a listing of notices posted – the label of “Society News” is mine. They do not fall under any particular section of the newspaper.

  • Dr. Garfield Glass, of class of ’98 Meharry Medical College, went to Dawson Springs last week for his health.
  • Miss Bashie Williams, of 1717 Tenth avenue, South, left last Saturday for Chicago.
  • Mrs. Lizzie Henderson, of Chicago, is the guest of her niece, Mrs. Nicholas Perkins, of 1512 Harding street.
  • Mr. and Mrs. Robt. C. Eason spent a delightful afternoon Sunday in the country near Brentwood.
  • Mrs. C. McGann, of Eigth avenue, North, was confined to her room Tuesday by a a slight indisposition.
  • Mr. James H. Davis, of 610 Sylvan street, is very sick.
  • Mr. Robert Williams, of 115 Jackson street, is indisposed this week.
  • Mrs. Samuel Caruthers, of Columbia, with her children, “Bob” and Bona, will spend two weeks in the city visiting Mr. and Mrs. William Caruthers, of 611 Jo Johnston avenue.
  • Miss Ruthella, the little daughter of Dr. and Mrs. G. H. Bandy, has gone to the Hermitage to spend several weeks with her grandparents.
  • Miss Cora Allen, of the Baptist Publishing house, is confined at home on account of sickness.
  • Mrs. A. L. King, of Fourth avenue, South, is slightly indisposed.
  • Mrs. Missouri Allen, of Pulaski, Tenn., is visiting her brother, Prof. J.B. Batte.
  • Mrs. Josie O. Hughes is visiting relatives in the city.
  • Miss Sadie Stratton, of 632 Bass street, who has been very sick, is much improved.
  • Mrs. W. D. Chappelle and children are home after spending a while with relatives and friends at Columbia, S.C.
  • Isabella Horton, the world’s girl evangelist, will speak at Spruce Street Baptist Church on Sunday afternoon.
  • Mr. W.O. Tate, of Eighth avenue, North, is taking a week “off” for recuperation. Tuesday he spent the evening in the country with Dr. Noel, Wednesday he spent part of the day making rounds with Dr. Stewart, and the rest of the week was spent around and about home, working out of the program arranged daily by Mrs. Tate, his genial, affable and most industrious wife.

Deaths – June 28, 1907

June 28, 1907 of the Nashville Globeissueid=1

Henrietta Sample, 713 Winter street, 68 years
Jessie Mason, Creek and Hill streets, 12 years
Felix Hollensville, Simmons Avenue, near Cedar, 8 months
George W. Washington, 1306 Fourth avenue, North, rear, 1 year
Infant of Mary Culp, 1620 Hubb alley
Mary Alice Marshall, 2521 Stewart street, 1 year
Chas. Collins, City Hospital, 28 years
Margaret Furgeson, 3011 West End, 6 months
Mansfield Jenkins, 116 Whiteside street, 2 years
Lorengo Roland, 811 Fourth avenue South, rear, 45 years
Zelma Woodard, 414 rear North Fifth street, 2 years
Bruce Reynolds, 1116 Ninth avenue, South, 55 years
Andrew Bardsay, 28 East Hill street, 29 years
Luttie Rothrock, 110 Fifth avenue, South, 27 years
Julia Williams, Davidson, 195 Filmore street, 9 months
Phillip Murphy, 1117 Church street, 45 years
Moses Patterson, Twenty-fourth avenue, North, 17 years
Robert Hill, 1202 Kayne avenue, 4 months
Sammie Bailey, 1021 Fourteenth avenue, North, 21 years
Alexander Scott, 927 Warren street, 32 years
Mary Puryear, Clifton avenue, 54 years
Harris Robert Davis, 511 Peabody street, 1 month
Mattie Riley, Creek street, 11 months
Lucy Carver, 43 Claiborne street, 53 years
Ella Ranson, 1823 Sixth avenue, North, 31 years
Infant of Walter and Alice Alexander, 515 Sixth avenue, South
Eugene Snowden, 524 Sycamore street
William Crandle, State Prison, 17 years
Fyle Thompson, Nolensville pike, 17 years
Margaret Anna Wooten, 3 miles Harding pike, 14 years

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