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    The Jubilee Singers. (1875). Image courtesy of the New York Public Library.

Murfreesboro Notes (1 Mar 1907)

From the Nashville Globe – March 1, 1907

  • The pupils of Bradley Academy celebrated George Washington’s birthday last Friday, February 22.  A very interesting programmed was rendered.  Those on the programme were Misses Sallie R. Anderson, Vera Lee Coleman, Maggie Eules, Mary and Amanda McClain, Annie M. Prim, Darrow Reed,  Willie Todd.  Messrs. Percy Jordan, Richard Burks, Thos. Lillard, of seventh grade;  Lela Anderson, Laura Meeks and Henry Lee Brown, fifth grade;  Master Charley Howse and Lavada Brooks, fourth grade;  Elizabeth Murray and Whitmore Carney of third grade; Ada Lee Alexander and Burrus Miller, of second grade; Nick Patterson, Betha Meeks and Samuel Rucker, of first grade.  The decorations were of red, white and blue flags.
  • Mrs. Annie Ransom entertained the Ladies’ Embroidery Club Saturday evening, February 23, 1907, at her home.  After the business meeting was over an elaborate luncheon was served by John Ella Bass, consisting of chicken, beaten biscuit, salad, fruit salad, cake and coffee.  Those present were Mesdames Mamie Vaughn, R.B. Meeks, H.P. Scales, G.B. Brady, Walter Page, Horace Mitchell, Misses Nannie Ransom, Beulah Miller, Dilsy Butler, Matilda Green and Elma A. Williams.
  • Mrs. Clara Ewing and Mrs. H.P. Scales are on the sick list.
  • Mrs. Ollie Officer, of Sparta, Tenn., who has been at the bed side of her mother, has returned home.
  • Mrs. Harden is convalescent.
  • Mr. P.A. Bently, of Nashville, Mr. Williams and Mr. Ewing, of Franklin, were the guests of Mrs. Clara Ewing.
  • Misses Nannie and Bettie Keeble have returned to Chicago.
  • Rev. James Moore has returned from Paris, Ky., where he has been carrying on a series of meetings.
  • Rev. D.P. Pearson had a successful rally Sunday, raising $19.00
  • Mrs. Lula McMurray, of Chattanooga, Tenn., who has been very ill at the home of her mother, is improving rapidly.

City Items – March 1, 1907

From the Nashville Globe – 1 Mar 1907

  • Mrs. P.R. Burrus, Mrs. N.J. Anderson, Mrs. Ligon, Mrs. R.S. White, Mrs. Ferguson and Miss Lena Jackson, representing the esteem and love of many of their friends, came laden with good things Saturday night to the parsonage of Howard Church, making the hearts of the pastor and wife glad.  Rev. J. Bond says  “Come again.”
  • The Misses Franklin, of 78 Claiborne street, were called to North Nashville Tuesday morning to attned the funeral of their cousin, Carrie E. Cleveland.
  • Mrs. Elizabeth Becton, of 819 Stevens street, left for Battle Creek, Mich., Saturday night.
  • There will be a parlor concert on Wednesday evening, March 6, at the residence of Miss Mattie Matthews, 440 Eigth avenue, North, by the Willing Workers Club for the benefit of Tabernacle Baptist Church.
  • Miss Zenith McKatherine, who waited on her sick father until his death, never wearied, her kind hands were willing to do all they could to add to his comfort.  One year ago she left Walden University, and went to Lake Providence to attend her father, Mr.  Thom. McKatherine.  She did her duty lovingly and faithfully until the end.
  • Mr. I.W. Hydye, of 1606 Alberta Avenue, is suffering from influenza.
  • Mr. John Watkins arrived from New Orleans Tuesday night.
  • Mr. Jno. Langston Poole, of Meharry Medical College, leaves this week for Chicago.
  • The Meharry commencement has been changed from the first of April to the 29th of March.
  • Mrs. I.J. Jordan, of 514 Watkins street, who has been ill, is much improved.
  • Mr. William D. Boger was called to Marietta, Ga., last Saturday to attend the funeral of his grandmother who died last Friday.  He returned to the city Monday.
  • Prof. W.L. Cansler, though still confined to his room, is improving.
  • Quite a large number of Meharry boys left last Saturday for Chicago.
  • The Fisk Literary Club will hold its next meeting at the home of Miss Laura Stump, Twelfth avenue, North and Jackson street, March 7, at three o’clock.
  • Mrs. Myrtle Hicks and children have returned to their home in Indianapolis after a visit to her mother Mrs. Hill.
  • Mr. Eugene Clayton, of East Nasvhille, will leave in a few days for New York, Buffalo and Washington, D.C.  Mr. Clayton will be out of the city for about two weeks.
  • Attorney G.F. Anderson took a brief trip to Gallatin, Tenn., on legal business and it was quite successful.  He also made a trip to Livingston, Tenn.
  • The young ladies’ club of the First Baptist Church, East Nashville, will give their entertainment March 11.
  • Mr. and Mrs. Frank Carter were called to their home in Evansville, Ind., on the account of sudden illness of her mother.
  • The young men’s club of First Baptist Church, East Nashville, gave an entertainment Monday night which proved quite a success.
  • The death of Mrs. Mary Mason, mother of Miss Queenie Arnold, of East Nashville, was very sad.  The funeral took place Tuesday.
  • The Ladies’ Imperial Needlework Club met in regular meeting with Mrs. Napoleon Ransom, Wedndesday afternoon.  Several important topics were discussed, after which an article on “What women are doing” was read by Mrs. Herrod, which was very effective.  The ladies adjourned to meet next week with Mrs. J.H. Smith, of Phillips street.
  • Mrs. A.C. Gibson, of South High street, who has been reported very sick, is much improved.
  • Mr. Louis D. Bumbrey, who for some time was in the employ of the National Baptist Publishing Board, is in town.
  • Mrs. A.E. Montague, of 526 Fourth avenue, South, is slightly indispose this week.
  • The many friends of Mrs. A.J. Dodd will regret to learn that she is confined to her bed again.  At this writing she is improving.
  • Miss Annie May Neely has returned to the city after a month’s stay with her uncle in Columbia.  Mr. Harry McLawrine, who has been visiting his mother in Mt. Pleasant, accompanied Miss Neely back to the city.
  • Mrs. William Dopson, of 1892 Fourth avenue, North, is going to spend the latter part of the month in Columbia, Ohio.
  • Mrs. Ella Brown Beard passed away on the 22nd of this month.  Her funeral was held on the 24th at the Fifteenth Avenue Baptist Church.
  • Mrs. James Dismukes entertained Wednesday at her home, 516 Fourteenth avenue, North.  Mrs. Wm. Richardson, of 1207 Phillips street, and Mrs. W.M. Cannon and little daughter, Glenora, with a one o’clock dinner.
  • Born to Mr. and Mrs. George L. Stratton, of 1507 Fourteenth avenue, a girl.  Mother and daughter are doing nicely.
  • Mr. and Mrs. Richard Jackson were entertained at her home 315 Eighth avenue, North, with her many friends, Monday night, February 25, she being thirty-four years old.  Those prsent were Mesdames Warmack, Frierson, Burrus, Dozier, Young, Overton, Misses Josie Thompson, Bell, Messrs. Jordan, Overton.  Dr. B.F. Davis spoke to the guests on “Life is what you make it.”  A number of presents were received by Mrs. Jackson.
  • Mrs. Lyttleton Jones has been confined to her bed for several days, suffering from an attack of la-grippe.  Mrs. Jones and daughter, Mrs. Kate Steele are located at 707 Jefferson street and Seventh avenue, North.
  • Mrs. Eliza Davidson, who has been sick for the last two weeks, is very much improved.
  • Mr. Jno. L. Cheatham, of 819 Eighteenth avenue, is on the sick list this week.
  • Mr. and Mrs. Prince, of Patterson street, spent Sunday and Sunday night in Franklin with his mother, who is very ill.
  • Mrs. Whigsaw, of 1918 Broadway, is expecting her two sisters from Indianapolis soon.
  • Mrs. Rueben O’Neal, who has been sick for several weeks, is up and out again.  She wishes to thank her many friends for their kindness during her illness.

Smyrna Notes

Nashville Globe – 1 Mar 1907

Smyrna Notes

  • Mrs. Martha A. Thompson and Mr. George Edmondson were quietly married last Sunday.
  • Madames M.C. Wade, S.K. Ridley and George M.  Jordan were in the city last week visiting relatives and friends. 
  • Miss Mary Cartwright has joined Miss E.M. Perry’s class in instrumental music.
  • Mrs. Ellen C. Elliott, surrounded by a host of friends left for Hot Springs Sunday night feeling much refreshed by her two months’ vacation. 
  • Miss Ellen Baker has gone to the city to spend a few weeks. 
  • News of the death of Mrs. Mary Mason, of East Nashville, formerly of this place, has been sadly received.

Kelly- Winfrey

Nashville Globe: July 5, 1907

Little Rock, Ark., June 27 — the wedding of Miss Mabel Winfrey, of this city, and Mr. John H. Kelly Jr., of Nashville, was solomnized at the First Congregational Church of Battle Rock Wednesday evening. The general opinion is that it was one of the prettiest weddings ever witnessed among the people of the City of Roses. The church was beautifully decorated with cut flowers, potted plants, ferns and lilies, forming a beautiful background. The arch under which the happy couple stood was laden with lilies from the center of which hung a floral design in the shape of a bell. This made a picture long to be remembered. While the audience was waiting for the bridal party to enter Miss Carrie Booker rendered a very sweet selection, “Dearie.”

To the strains of Mendelssohn’s wedding march, played by Miss Stella E. Bush, the bridal party entered, led by the four ushers, Messrs. Frank A. Young, Oscar A. Miller, Berestful W. Jackson and Chester E. Bush. Next came the four bridesmaids, Misses Mattie A. Booker, Ethel M. Pitts, Mattie C. Winfrey and Maggie E. Kelly, of Columbia, Tenn., beautifully gowned in pink, green, blue and lavender organdies respectively, carrying carnations and ferns. The best man, Dr. Frank B. Adair, of Humphrey, Ark., followed by the matron of honor, Mrs. Lida Gilliane, of Ft. Smith, Ark., gowned in white chiffon with blue ribbons and carrying an armful of white carnations and ferns, entered. After these came the ring bearer, little Sara Booker, dressed in white embroidered swiss. She was followed by two little flower girls, Olga Jordan and Hazel Lindsay, who were dressed in white accordion pleated organdies, carrying baskets filled with roses which they strewed in the brides’ path. From the vestry room in the rear came Mr. John H. Kelly, Jr., who stood under the arch and awaited the coming of the bride, who entered leaning on the arm of her brother, Mr. Robert C. Winfrey. The bride’s dress was a creation of white silk chiffon over liberty satin with panel front and yoke of imported silk embroidered chiffon, trimmed with frills of accordion pleated chiffon, white satin ribbon and chiffon rush. Her veil which extended to the end of her train, was caught up with orange blossoms. She carried an armful of bride’s roses. During the ceremony, which was performed by Ref. Y. B. Sims, the pastor, Miss Birdie Mae Boyd, of Oberlin, O., sang sweetly “O Promise Me.”

The reception was at the bride’s home, 2400 Adams street.

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