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    The Jubilee Singers. (1875). Image courtesy of the New York Public Library.

City Items – March 1, 1907

From the Nashville Globe – 1 Mar 1907

  • Mrs. P.R. Burrus, Mrs. N.J. Anderson, Mrs. Ligon, Mrs. R.S. White, Mrs. Ferguson and Miss Lena Jackson, representing the esteem and love of many of their friends, came laden with good things Saturday night to the parsonage of Howard Church, making the hearts of the pastor and wife glad.  Rev. J. Bond says  “Come again.”
  • The Misses Franklin, of 78 Claiborne street, were called to North Nashville Tuesday morning to attned the funeral of their cousin, Carrie E. Cleveland.
  • Mrs. Elizabeth Becton, of 819 Stevens street, left for Battle Creek, Mich., Saturday night.
  • There will be a parlor concert on Wednesday evening, March 6, at the residence of Miss Mattie Matthews, 440 Eigth avenue, North, by the Willing Workers Club for the benefit of Tabernacle Baptist Church.
  • Miss Zenith McKatherine, who waited on her sick father until his death, never wearied, her kind hands were willing to do all they could to add to his comfort.  One year ago she left Walden University, and went to Lake Providence to attend her father, Mr.  Thom. McKatherine.  She did her duty lovingly and faithfully until the end.
  • Mr. I.W. Hydye, of 1606 Alberta Avenue, is suffering from influenza.
  • Mr. John Watkins arrived from New Orleans Tuesday night.
  • Mr. Jno. Langston Poole, of Meharry Medical College, leaves this week for Chicago.
  • The Meharry commencement has been changed from the first of April to the 29th of March.
  • Mrs. I.J. Jordan, of 514 Watkins street, who has been ill, is much improved.
  • Mr. William D. Boger was called to Marietta, Ga., last Saturday to attend the funeral of his grandmother who died last Friday.  He returned to the city Monday.
  • Prof. W.L. Cansler, though still confined to his room, is improving.
  • Quite a large number of Meharry boys left last Saturday for Chicago.
  • The Fisk Literary Club will hold its next meeting at the home of Miss Laura Stump, Twelfth avenue, North and Jackson street, March 7, at three o’clock.
  • Mrs. Myrtle Hicks and children have returned to their home in Indianapolis after a visit to her mother Mrs. Hill.
  • Mr. Eugene Clayton, of East Nasvhille, will leave in a few days for New York, Buffalo and Washington, D.C.  Mr. Clayton will be out of the city for about two weeks.
  • Attorney G.F. Anderson took a brief trip to Gallatin, Tenn., on legal business and it was quite successful.  He also made a trip to Livingston, Tenn.
  • The young ladies’ club of the First Baptist Church, East Nashville, will give their entertainment March 11.
  • Mr. and Mrs. Frank Carter were called to their home in Evansville, Ind., on the account of sudden illness of her mother.
  • The young men’s club of First Baptist Church, East Nashville, gave an entertainment Monday night which proved quite a success.
  • The death of Mrs. Mary Mason, mother of Miss Queenie Arnold, of East Nashville, was very sad.  The funeral took place Tuesday.
  • The Ladies’ Imperial Needlework Club met in regular meeting with Mrs. Napoleon Ransom, Wedndesday afternoon.  Several important topics were discussed, after which an article on “What women are doing” was read by Mrs. Herrod, which was very effective.  The ladies adjourned to meet next week with Mrs. J.H. Smith, of Phillips street.
  • Mrs. A.C. Gibson, of South High street, who has been reported very sick, is much improved.
  • Mr. Louis D. Bumbrey, who for some time was in the employ of the National Baptist Publishing Board, is in town.
  • Mrs. A.E. Montague, of 526 Fourth avenue, South, is slightly indispose this week.
  • The many friends of Mrs. A.J. Dodd will regret to learn that she is confined to her bed again.  At this writing she is improving.
  • Miss Annie May Neely has returned to the city after a month’s stay with her uncle in Columbia.  Mr. Harry McLawrine, who has been visiting his mother in Mt. Pleasant, accompanied Miss Neely back to the city.
  • Mrs. William Dopson, of 1892 Fourth avenue, North, is going to spend the latter part of the month in Columbia, Ohio.
  • Mrs. Ella Brown Beard passed away on the 22nd of this month.  Her funeral was held on the 24th at the Fifteenth Avenue Baptist Church.
  • Mrs. James Dismukes entertained Wednesday at her home, 516 Fourteenth avenue, North.  Mrs. Wm. Richardson, of 1207 Phillips street, and Mrs. W.M. Cannon and little daughter, Glenora, with a one o’clock dinner.
  • Born to Mr. and Mrs. George L. Stratton, of 1507 Fourteenth avenue, a girl.  Mother and daughter are doing nicely.
  • Mr. and Mrs. Richard Jackson were entertained at her home 315 Eighth avenue, North, with her many friends, Monday night, February 25, she being thirty-four years old.  Those prsent were Mesdames Warmack, Frierson, Burrus, Dozier, Young, Overton, Misses Josie Thompson, Bell, Messrs. Jordan, Overton.  Dr. B.F. Davis spoke to the guests on “Life is what you make it.”  A number of presents were received by Mrs. Jackson.
  • Mrs. Lyttleton Jones has been confined to her bed for several days, suffering from an attack of la-grippe.  Mrs. Jones and daughter, Mrs. Kate Steele are located at 707 Jefferson street and Seventh avenue, North.
  • Mrs. Eliza Davidson, who has been sick for the last two weeks, is very much improved.
  • Mr. Jno. L. Cheatham, of 819 Eighteenth avenue, is on the sick list this week.
  • Mr. and Mrs. Prince, of Patterson street, spent Sunday and Sunday night in Franklin with his mother, who is very ill.
  • Mrs. Whigsaw, of 1918 Broadway, is expecting her two sisters from Indianapolis soon.
  • Mrs. Rueben O’Neal, who has been sick for several weeks, is up and out again.  She wishes to thank her many friends for their kindness during her illness.

Clarksville Notes – July 19, 1907

As published in the Nashville Globe:

Since the passing of the saloon a noticeable feature is the entire absence of drunkeness and rowydism. If for no reason other than this, the local option law is to be commended. Strawberry avenue, the former thoroughfare of the saloon element, is deserted save in one or two instances, and at night the most unfrequented place, with only one light to guide the unwonted traveler. Several persons left the city before and after the closing law went into effect; but can it be said that this si the apparent cause of the remarkable behavior fo the citizens? While there are no open places for the thirsty within this desert town, a daily migration to the oases of Guthrie and Hopkinsville is seen.

A hairbreath escape from death with the only damage a demolished bicycle, was witnessed by many persons, on one of the principle streets of the city last Friday evening. A youth of rustic appearance was coasting down Franklin street hill when he noticed an automobile driven my a machinist gaining rapidly on him. Endeavoring to get out of its wake, the cyclist took the opposite side of the street, only to be followed by the automobile. The next instant, a head-end collision occurred with the above name result.

Clarksville, one of the poorest lighted towns in the state, did not hide its beacon brightness under a bushel measure, at the session of the Grand Lodge Knights of Pythias at Knoxville last week; but the representatives of the Twentieth Century Lodge commanded that august body of Pythians to see Clarksville as it is. Extensive movements are already on foot to make the Grand Lodge visit pleasant, and the largest attendance in the history of the fraternity is expected.

Beaming beatific beams and with hearts bent on pleasure, several merry picnickers from this city went to Hampton Station last Thursday morning to the annual outing of the Fin-de-Siele Club. The day seemed prone with many disappointments. Instead of arriving at the grounds on the first train passing, the merry-makers were relegated to the second, making them one hour and forty minutes nearer the meridian. Frozen desserts orderd, passed by in full view of the management, and came on the Clarksville express office, much to the discomfort of those present. The string band failed to show up; but the goose-bone man was there with a variety of weather that will not be forgotten soon. Not being satisfied with the first drenching rain, the elements made a second and more potent descent, causing some no doubt, to recall the Biblical recital of Noah and his ark. Night, however, gave relief to those clad in white, who had been without proper rain protection.

The announcement of the death of Mrs. Carrie Warfield which occurred last Sunday in her home in this city, will be received with sincere regret not only by relatives and friends of this place, but by relatives and acquaintances in distant communities. The services for the dead were said last Tuesday afternoon before a sorrowing crowd that taxed the capacity of Mt. Olive Baptist Church, with Rev. E. H. Smith officiating. Internment was at Golden Hill Cemetery.

Simple funeral services were said. [this next section of text missing from my photocopy]

Mrs. Annie M. Lowe of Nashville returned to the city Tuesday, after spending a few days with her parents.

Rev. and Mrs. Reed are at Jefferson.

Mrs. Eva Sneed has returned to the city to spend a few weeks.

Mrs. B. A. Darden and two little sons are visiting relatives and friends in the city this week.

Come to the Baptist Church Saturday night to the grand reception of Mother Goose.

Marriages – July 19, 1907

As reported in the July 19, 1907 issue of the Nashville Globe –the following were married.

Dick Smith & Annie King
Richard Dixon & Lizzie Roddy
Thomas Hurt & Hattie Symptom
A. Tunsell and Emma Fatcher
Maud Riley & Add Hampton
John Watkins & Clara Cross
Will Williams & Eva Kiser
John Boss & Lizzie Miller
Cleveland Toower & Unis B. Harris
Dennis Crutcher & Ada Brown
Grant Hamlet & Susie McMilliam
John Hill & Mary Taylor

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