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    The Jubilee Singers. (1875). Image courtesy of the New York Public Library.

Murfreesboro Notes (1 Mar 1907)

From the Nashville Globe – March 1, 1907

  • The pupils of Bradley Academy celebrated George Washington’s birthday last Friday, February 22.  A very interesting programmed was rendered.  Those on the programme were Misses Sallie R. Anderson, Vera Lee Coleman, Maggie Eules, Mary and Amanda McClain, Annie M. Prim, Darrow Reed,  Willie Todd.  Messrs. Percy Jordan, Richard Burks, Thos. Lillard, of seventh grade;  Lela Anderson, Laura Meeks and Henry Lee Brown, fifth grade;  Master Charley Howse and Lavada Brooks, fourth grade;  Elizabeth Murray and Whitmore Carney of third grade; Ada Lee Alexander and Burrus Miller, of second grade; Nick Patterson, Betha Meeks and Samuel Rucker, of first grade.  The decorations were of red, white and blue flags.
  • Mrs. Annie Ransom entertained the Ladies’ Embroidery Club Saturday evening, February 23, 1907, at her home.  After the business meeting was over an elaborate luncheon was served by John Ella Bass, consisting of chicken, beaten biscuit, salad, fruit salad, cake and coffee.  Those present were Mesdames Mamie Vaughn, R.B. Meeks, H.P. Scales, G.B. Brady, Walter Page, Horace Mitchell, Misses Nannie Ransom, Beulah Miller, Dilsy Butler, Matilda Green and Elma A. Williams.
  • Mrs. Clara Ewing and Mrs. H.P. Scales are on the sick list.
  • Mrs. Ollie Officer, of Sparta, Tenn., who has been at the bed side of her mother, has returned home.
  • Mrs. Harden is convalescent.
  • Mr. P.A. Bently, of Nashville, Mr. Williams and Mr. Ewing, of Franklin, were the guests of Mrs. Clara Ewing.
  • Misses Nannie and Bettie Keeble have returned to Chicago.
  • Rev. James Moore has returned from Paris, Ky., where he has been carrying on a series of meetings.
  • Rev. D.P. Pearson had a successful rally Sunday, raising $19.00
  • Mrs. Lula McMurray, of Chattanooga, Tenn., who has been very ill at the home of her mother, is improving rapidly.

Former Chicago Visitor Marries

From the Chicago Defender – 1 Mar 1919 

As included in the Military Intelligence on Negro Subversion, 1917-1940 collection on Footnote.com

Announcement was received here several weeks ago of the marriage of Dr. John E. Burchess, Forest City, Ark., a recent graduate of Meharry Medical College, to Miss Thelma B. Williams, also of Forest City.  It will be remembered that Dr. Burchess was in the city two summers ago, at which time he was royally entertained by friends and admirers. 

Journal of the National Medical Association

Combining my librairnaship with genealogy, I thought it would be worthwhile to post the fact that the Journal of the National Medical Association is now available online at PubMed Central, a repository of full-text biomedical literature made available by the National Library of Medicine.  As stated on their website, the mission of the National Medical Association (NMA) is to ” advance the art and science of medicine for people of African descent through education, advocacy, and health policy to promote health and wellness, eliminate health disparities, and sustain physician viability.”

Their journal has been published since 1909.  As stated on a blog post of the Southeastern Atlantic Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, the journal ” provides historical insight into the social, medical and public health issues that continue to be of particular concern to African American patients and physicians. It has also served as a venue to challenge disparaging interpretations of African American health history published in other medical and social science journals.”

It can also be beneficial for genealogists if you’ve had family members and people of interest active in the African-American medical fields.  A range of information can be found within the pages of the journal, from lectures, articles, and social news such as marriages.  Even obituaries are in the journal, such as the obituary of Dr. Daniel Hale Williams, the first black cardiologist and another Meharrian.  I even did my duty and added a link to it from his Wikipedia page.  Dr. Williams was one of the co-founders of the NMA. 

For example, the very first issue has an article by Dr. A.M. Townsend of Meharry Medical College.  I’ve blogged about him previously on this blog and even been contacted by one of his descendants. I’ll have to make sure to send this on to him.  Townsend’s article is titled “The preservation of pharmacotherapy necessary to medical advance.”

The second issue has an article by another Meharrian, Dr. C.V. Roman, also someone who’s name has appeared on this blog.  His article was titled “Woman’s Work” and in an address he gave to the graduating class of nurses at Lamar College in Georgia in 1909. 

This collection is definitely worth browsing or searching. If you wish to browse the issues, you may go here, but the best way to search the collection is to go here and enter your search term of interest but add this (include the quotation marks) after your search term in order to restrict to this specific journal:  “Journal of the National Medical Association”[Jour]

Happy searching!

McClain-Stewart Nuptials

Nashville Globe: July 5, 1907

One of the prettiest home weddings of this season was witnessed by a company of about 150 relatives and friends on Wednesday, June 26, at high noon, at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Stewart, 99 Claiborne street, when Miss Fate Lou Stewart and Dr. T. E. McClain were united in marriage. Before a back ground of ferns, vines, and flowers the ceremony was performed promptly at 12 o’clock. Rev. Fisher, pastor of Olive Baptist Church in Chicago, came down to perform the ceremony, which he did in a very simple yet impressive manner.

The bridal party entered the drawing room through bridal gates wreathed in southern smilax and roses, which were opened by two little girls, Aileen Streator and Jenetta Bright, who were beautifully dressed in white lingerie frocks and blue sashes; next came the maid of honor, and the bride’s only attendant, Miss Lillian A. Bright. She was gowned in a blue batiste beautifully trimmed in lace and tucks, blue slippers, gloves, girdle and a blue hair braid hat were worn. She carried a large bouquet of pink carnations tied with blue ribbons; next came the little flower girl, Lillian Dixon, strewing flowers along the bride’s pathway. She wore a pretty lingerie dress with white ribbons. Then came the bride leaning on the arm of her brother, Mr. Wm. Stewart, of Michigan, who gave her in marriage. The bride never appeared more beautiful than she did in her wedding robe. A charming picture of loveliness, in a French mouseline elaborately trimmed in real Val lace and numerous fine tucks, with a white pompadour satin girdle. A handmade milline hat, with ostrich plumes and jeweled pins completed the toilet. She carried a beautiful bouquet of bride’s roses and ferns, tied with white satin ribbon. Her only ornaments were a diamond ring, the gift of the groom, and diamond earrings, the gift of her mother.

The groom, with his best man, Mr. Eugene Page, entered from the hall and met the bride at the altar. Both wore Prince Alberts with gray trousers and gloves.

The bridal party formed a semi-circle around the altar which made a beautiful picture long to be remembered. After the ceremony all turned and faced the audience to receive congratulations.

Mrs. Jennie Ballentyne presided at the piano, playing the wedding march, also accompanying the two soloists, Dr. Mattie Coleman sang “Love me, and the world is mine” very sweetly, “Because God made you mine” was beautifully rendered by Miss Alberta K. Davis.

The receiving party consisted of Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Stewart, Mr. and Mrs. John Cunningham, Misses Mattie Scales, Rebecca McCants and Lettie Black. The wedding register was kept by Miss Elizabeth Elliott. Frappe was dispensed to the guests by Hattie May Stewart and Pryor Williams.

The presents were many, rare, costly, valuable, and too numerous to mention here.

Mr. and Mrs. McClain left on the 7:40 train for Denver, Colo., their future home, where the doctor has already established himself. The bride’s going away dress wa a blue taffeta, made guimpe with lingerie blouse, tan hat, belt, slippers and gloves.

The out of town guests were Rev. and Dr. Coleman, of Clarksville; Miss Lettie Black, of Jefferson, and Rev. E. J. Fisher of Chicago; Mr. William Stewart of Michigan, who came down especially to attend the marriage; Dr. Edwards, of McMinnville; Dr. Reed, of Kentucky.

[I think there may be more that is cut off in my copy] IssueID=2

Society News – June 28, 1907

As published in the Nashville Globe:

These are a listing of notices posted – the label of “Society News” is mine. They do not fall under any particular section of the newspaper.

  • Dr. Garfield Glass, of class of ’98 Meharry Medical College, went to Dawson Springs last week for his health.
  • Miss Bashie Williams, of 1717 Tenth avenue, South, left last Saturday for Chicago.
  • Mrs. Lizzie Henderson, of Chicago, is the guest of her niece, Mrs. Nicholas Perkins, of 1512 Harding street.
  • Mr. and Mrs. Robt. C. Eason spent a delightful afternoon Sunday in the country near Brentwood.
  • Mrs. C. McGann, of Eigth avenue, North, was confined to her room Tuesday by a a slight indisposition.
  • Mr. James H. Davis, of 610 Sylvan street, is very sick.
  • Mr. Robert Williams, of 115 Jackson street, is indisposed this week.
  • Mrs. Samuel Caruthers, of Columbia, with her children, “Bob” and Bona, will spend two weeks in the city visiting Mr. and Mrs. William Caruthers, of 611 Jo Johnston avenue.
  • Miss Ruthella, the little daughter of Dr. and Mrs. G. H. Bandy, has gone to the Hermitage to spend several weeks with her grandparents.
  • Miss Cora Allen, of the Baptist Publishing house, is confined at home on account of sickness.
  • Mrs. A. L. King, of Fourth avenue, South, is slightly indisposed.
  • Mrs. Missouri Allen, of Pulaski, Tenn., is visiting her brother, Prof. J.B. Batte.
  • Mrs. Josie O. Hughes is visiting relatives in the city.
  • Miss Sadie Stratton, of 632 Bass street, who has been very sick, is much improved.
  • Mrs. W. D. Chappelle and children are home after spending a while with relatives and friends at Columbia, S.C.
  • Isabella Horton, the world’s girl evangelist, will speak at Spruce Street Baptist Church on Sunday afternoon.
  • Mr. W.O. Tate, of Eighth avenue, North, is taking a week “off” for recuperation. Tuesday he spent the evening in the country with Dr. Noel, Wednesday he spent part of the day making rounds with Dr. Stewart, and the rest of the week was spent around and about home, working out of the program arranged daily by Mrs. Tate, his genial, affable and most industrious wife.

Deaths – July 19, 1907

Deaths as reported in the July 19, 1907 issue of the Nashville Globe:

Hester Copeland, Glen Cliff, Tenn., 14 years
Infant of Henry and Leallie Wiggins, 1717 Sevier Street
Chas. Webb Jr., Cumberland River, 14 years
Mary Mayness, 1213 Higgins street, 39 years
Mary Smith, Gyser (Trimble Bottom), 29 years
Infant of Fred and Emma Shute, 4 days
Uyley Otten, 8 miles Whites Creek Pike, 23 years
Green Lance, County Asylum, 55 years
John Beasley, County Asylum, 85 years
Wm. Irandale, State Prison, 17 years
Josephine Price, 449 Eight avenue North, 31 years
Fannie Payne, Memphis Tenn., 43 years
Ada Loraaine, City Hospital, 19 years
Lottie Booker, 804 First Avenue North, 39 years
Alonzo Taylor, West Hill, 6 months
Levy Myert, 1002 Stevenson avenue, 15 years
Georgie Williams, 19 Willow street, 28 days
John Steanfield, Clifton avenue, near Nashville, 1 year
Lewis Benfor, Mulloys alley, 17 years
Felix Cotton, 714 Fogg street, 45 years
Fannie May Hollinsworth, Cedar street and Twenty-fourth avenue N., 30 years
Eliza Dillahunty, 906 Ninth avenue South, 2 years
Adeline Gowen, 522 Sixth avenue South, 75 years
Minnie McKeeble, 425 Twelfth avenue North, 29 years
Jas Henry Whitsey, 919 Ewing avenue, 6 months
Jessie Jointer Jr, City Hospital, 29 years

Marriages – July 19, 1907

As reported in the July 19, 1907 issue of the Nashville Globe –the following were married.

Dick Smith & Annie King
Richard Dixon & Lizzie Roddy
Thomas Hurt & Hattie Symptom
A. Tunsell and Emma Fatcher
Maud Riley & Add Hampton
John Watkins & Clara Cross
Will Williams & Eva Kiser
John Boss & Lizzie Miller
Cleveland Toower & Unis B. Harris
Dennis Crutcher & Ada Brown
Grant Hamlet & Susie McMilliam
John Hill & Mary Taylor

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